CrossDrilledRotors.ca Official Blog

The Canadian Brakes Blog

  • Monroe Brakes Technician’s Guide

    A new brake system diagnosis and repair guide for professional technicians is now available from Tenneco’s Monroe Brakes brand.

    The 16-page, illustrated, free publication, “A Professional Technician’s Guide to Brake Service,” includes in-depth information regarding the evolution of automotive brake system technologies as well as proven steps for identifying and correcting common brake performance issues.

    Featuring a laminated “flip-book” format, the Monroe Brakes guide includes detailed diagrams of the mechanical, hydraulic and electronic components represented in a modern brake system, as well as recommended steps designed to ensure a fast, complete repair that enhances customer confidence and loyalty.

    “Brake diagnosis and repair are becoming increasingly complex with each new generation of vehicle technology,” said Tom Connelly, national marketing and sales manager, Monroe Brakes.  “Our new technician’s guide, in combination with our extensive portfolio of other technical resources, can help professionals minimize the chances of comebacks, ultimately leading to superior customer satisfaction and loyalty.”

    For technicians requiring additional technical support for a specific brake repair challenge, the guide outlines the resources available through Tenneco’s Technical Resource Center, including live Techline assistance from ASE-certified professionals, training clinics and DVDs, and Web-based print and video tools.

    To order a copy of the Monroe Brakes “A Professional Technician’s Guide to Brake Service” training guide and learn more about the Monroe Brakes product line, contact your Monroe Brakes or Tenneco

  • Monroe Brakes master catalog

    Tenneco has published a new Monroe Brakes master catalog featuring hundreds of additional part numbers covering millions of passenger vehicles and severe duty/commercial vehicle applications.

    Tenneco says the Monroe Brakes line represents a comprehensive, single-source offering of ultra-premium and premium friction solutions and related brake products for the North American vehicle population.

    Included in the newly expanded Monroe Brakes line are 184 additional Monroe ProSolution premium brake pad sets featuring performance-verified ceramic or semi-metallic friction formulations and original equipment-style shim technology.

    The catalog also features the expanded Monroe Total Solution ultra-premium brake pad offering, with nearly 56 new pad sets providing coverage of 44.5 million additional European, Asian and North American passenger vehicles.

    Also included in the catalog are several additional Severe Solution brake pad sets for hard-working trucks, emergency and fleet vehicles and other severe-use applications; 20 new premium brake shoe sets; and an expanded range of replacement, OE-style wire wear sensors for unique applications.

  • Bendix Brakes Announces Enhanced Stop By Bendix Automotive Brake Product Line

    Bendix Brakes Announces Enhanced Stop By Bendix Automotive Brake Product Line

    MAT Holdings, Inc. has announced the launch of the enhanced Bendix brand Stop by Bendix product line, which offers complete all-makes, all-models automotive brake product coverage. Stop by Bendix automotive brake products are designed and manufactured to meet or exceed OEM specifications.

    The enhanced Stop by Bendix product line doubles the coverage of the previous product line to offer coverage for all makes and models of passenger cars and light-duty trucks. The product line features an improved shim design, offering quieter performance, as well as the signature Bendix blue burnishing stripe. This stripe acts as a lubricant during the brake products’ break-in period, ensuring noise-free performance.

    Stop by Bendix products feature proprietary friction formulations and multi-layer brake shims that deliver smooth, reliable, and quiet performance, and meets or exceeds the performance of the vehicle’s original brake products. The enhanced product line was developed to address the specific needs of consumers for high-quality, high-performance brake products designed specifically for their vehicle and available at competitive price points. For more information about the Stop by Bendix line of automotive brake products, visit http://www.bendix-brakes.com/stop_by_bendix.php.

  • Monroe Brakes spring promotion on now

    Tenneco’s Monroe Brakes has introduced its “Spring Consumer” promotion for customers buying their popular brake pads.

    The promotion offers customers a $15 prepaid MasterCard gift card with the purchase of one qualifying set of ultra-premium Monroe Total Solution ceramic or semi-metallic brake pads and a $30 prepaid MasterCard for the purchase of two sets. The brake pads included is the promotion are those with CX and DX prefix part numbers.

    “Poor stopping distance, pulsating pedals or high-pitched squealing or grinding – these are signs that it’s time to have your technician inspect your vehicle’s brake pads for possible replacement,” said Andrew DeSmidt, promotions manager, Tenneco. “This promotion helps motorists save on their purchases during this car repair season.”

    The spring promotion is on now until May 31. All forms must be postmarked and mailed by June 30 to the Monroe Brakes Spring Consumer Promotion Headquarters, PO Box 855, Streetsville, ON L5M 2C4 to qualify.

    To download the promotion forms, click here.

  • Raybestos Brand Brake Pads Released for Late Model Import Applications

    Raybestos Brand Brake Pads Released for Late Model Import Applications

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc – has added listings for 54 makes and 294 models that cover the 2013 model year.

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc – has added listings for54 makes and 294 models that cover the 2013 model year.

    The following late model part numbers have been added to the Raybestos brand brake catalog:

    2012-2013 Hyundai Accent; 2012-2013 Kia Rio and Rio 5

    • P/N PGD1593C, Front Brake Pads

    2012-2013 Nissan Versa

    • P/N PGD1592C, Front Brake Pads

    2011-2012 Porsche Cayenne and Touareg

    • P/N PGD1349M, Front Brake Pads

    2013 Toyota Tundra and Sequoia

    • P/N 980583, Front Brake Rotor
    • P/N 980584, Rear Brake Rotor
    • P/N RC/FRC12026, Front Left Caliper
    • P/N RC/FRC12025, Front Right Caliper
    • P/N RC/FRC12028, Rear Left Caliper
    • P/N RC/FRC12027, Rear Right Caliper

    Raybestos Professional Grade Ceramic brake pads use ceramic friction material that matches or improves on the OE ceramic formulation to provide maximum stopping power and safety. These pads achieve strong and silent braking with low dusting, improved pedal feel and enhanced responsiveness.

    Raybestos Professional Grade OE-Matched brake pads are engineered to restore factory performance and use semi-metallic applications that match or improve upon OE. The premium attached shims and application specific slots and chamfers ensure a smooth, quiet ride.

    Raybestos Professional Grade rotors include many problem solver applications and provide the highest level of dependability, safety and performance. The OE-based designs provide the most complete application-specific line on the market.

    RaybestosProfessional Grade calipers deliver smooth operation and leak-free performance. They follow OE specifications and arrive with NEW bleeder screws, copper sealing washers and hardware. Critical areas are also pre-lubricated with high temperature synthetic lubricant.

  • Raybestos Brand Brake Pads Released for Late Model Import Applications

    Raybestos Brand Brake Pads Released for Late Model Import Applications

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc. – has added the following late model part numbers to the Raybestos brand brake catalog:

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc. – has added the following late model part numbers to the Raybestos brand brake catalog:

    2011-2013 BMW 528i

    • P/N PGD1504M, Front Brake Pads

    2011-2013 BMW 535i and 2012-2013 BMW 640i

    • P/N PGD1505M, Front Brake Pads

    2011 Hyundai Equus and 2012 Genesis

    • P/N PGD1396C, Front Brake Pads

    2011-2013 Hyundai Sonata and 2013 Kia Optima

    • P/N PGD1445C, Rear Brake Pads

    Raybestos Professional Grade Ceramic brake pads use ceramic friction material that matches or improves on the OE ceramic formulation to provide maximum stopping power and safety. These pads achieve strong and silent braking with low dusting, improved pedal feel and enhanced responsiveness.

  • New Raybestos Brand Brake Pads and Rotors Added for Late Model Foreign and Domestic Applications

    New Raybestos Brand Brake Pads and Rotors Added for Late Model Foreign and Domestic Applications

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc. – has begun adding listings for the 2014 model year, with coverage for nine makes and thirteen 2014 models.

    Raybestos brand brake parts – a member of Brake Parts Inc. – has begun adding listings for the 2014 model year, with coverage for nine makes and thirteen 2014 models.

    In addition, the following late model import rotor and brake pad part numbers have been added to the Raybestos brand brake catalog:

    2010-2013 BMW X5 and 2011-2013 BMW X6

    • P/N PGD1429M, Front Brake Pads

    2012-2013 Lincoln MKS; 2012-2013 Ford Explorer,

    Flex and Taurus

    • P/N PGD1611C, Front Brake Pads

    2013-2014 Jeep Compass and Patriot

    • P/N PGD1285C, Front Brake Pads

    2013 Jeep Compass and Patriot

    • P/N PGD1037C, Rear Brake Pads

    2013 Mazda CX 5

    • P/N PGD1623C, Front Brake Pads

    2013 Subaru Impreza

    • P/N 980360 and 980356, Front Rotors

    • P/N 980634 and 980682, Rear Rotors

    Raybestos Professional Grade Ceramic brake pads use ceramic friction material that matches or improves on the OE ceramic formulation to provide maximum stopping power and safety. These pads achieve strong and silent braking with low dusting, improved pedal feel and enhanced responsiveness.

    Raybestos Professional Grade OE-Matched brake pads are engineered to restore factory performance and use semi-metallic applications that match or improve upon OE.

  • Affinia Global Brake and Chassis Receives Patent for Raybestos Brand R-300 Performance Rotors

    Affinia Global Brake and Chassis Receives Patent for Raybestos Brand R-300 Performance Rotors

    Brake Parts Inc., located in McHenry, Ill., has been assigned a patent (D640,620) for the design of its Raybestos brand R-300 disk brake rotor.

    Brake Parts Inc., located in McHenry, Ill., has been assigned a patent (D640,620) for the design of its Raybestos brand R-300 disk brake rotor.

    The newly patented “S-Groove” slot design delivers improved pedal feel and increased pad life. Drivers using the R-300 rotor experience stronger bite without having to sacrifice smooth braking.

    “The unique design of the R-300 maximizes pad to rotor contact to improve pedal feel and reduce brake fade,” said Rick Woodside, director of product development, Raybestos Rotors and Drums. He added, “Since this design also improves out-gassing, the S-Groove slots also help increase pad life by up to 30 per cent.”

    Brake fade is reduced due to improved out-gassing, and the rotor delivers superior “panic-stop” braking thanks to its high-flow, clog-resistant vane design. The rotor is also less prone to cracking; a problem that takes place on traditional drilled rotor designs.

    “The ‘S-Groove’ slot design has been proven on a dynamometer to allow simultaneous out-gassing on both the leading and trailing ends of the friction,” said Woodside. He said that the rapid inward circulation of air moves gases and particulate matter with centrifugal force to the outside of the rotor; allowing for constant escape of harmful heat and gasses.

    Listed on the patent is George J. Bielis IV of Ringwood, Ill., William V. Roberts of Crystal Lake, Ill., and Rick Woodside of Lake Geneva, Wis.

  • Brake Pedal Pulsation

    Brake Pedal Pulsation

    Pay attention to the details of how brakes work and you can avoid this issue

    When a brake pedal pulses beneath your foot, your first thought is probably “warped brake rotors.” Your next thought might be about how it happened, because if you’re going to get paid for the repair you want to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Fortunately, most things that cause brake pedal pulsation happen in the service bay. With close attention to detail, it’s easy to avoid these particular comebacks.
    The term “warped brake rotor” is used pretty loosely to define any brake rotor that isn’t flat and parallel with the plane of rotation. But there are other things that can cause brake pedal pulsation and there are ways that rotors can distort that don’t always produce pedal pulsation, but do affect braking. Understanding these things is the only way to guard against them or deal with them successfully if they do come back.

    Rotor Runout

    If you know how a disc brake works, it’s easy to visualize why you can feel warped rotors in the brake pedal. The rotor is shaped like a potato chip, the high spots push back against the caliper pistons as they rotate between the brake pads. That push is transmitted directly to the pedal and if the suspension bushings are worn, it might even cause steering wheel shimmy.
    Several things can cause a rotor to warp. Uneven heating or cooling is one culprit. A frequently cited example is driving through a deep puddle on a dry day with hot brake rotors. Another example is parking the vehicle without a “cool-down lap” after heavy brake use, such as after towing in hilly terrain.
    By far, the single most common cause of warped brake rotors is improper installation of the wheel. There was a time this was not so, but modern brake rotors are made thinner for faster cooling and to reduce unsprung weight. They’re not just thinner at the friction surface, there’s less material everywhere, including the hat section. This makes the rotor more susceptible to warping due to a combination of heat and improper lug nut torque.
    Manufacturers specify lug nut torque for the same reason they specify cylinder head bolt torque: to control distortion of the parts being bolted together. Most front-wheel-drive cars have one-piece cast iron brake rotors shaped like a top hat. The center “hat section” is clamped between the axle hub and the wheel. On most rotors, before the lug nuts are tightened, the rotor doesn’t fit flat against the hub; there’s a slight gap either toward the center of the hub or toward the outer diameter of the hub flange. That gap is less than five hundredths of a millimeter, but it’s supposed to be there.
    As the lug nuts are tightened, the hat section is forced flush against the hub, closing the gap. This slight bending of the rotor loads the hub/rotor assembly, increasing the overall strength and stiffness of both parts.
    If the lug nuts are over tightened or torqued unevenly, the stress loading is uneven. After a few heat cycles, the uneven loading creates a permanent distortion, as much a tenth of a millimeter, according to General Motors (GM). Usually, the rotor face stays flat but tilts with respect to the plane of rotation. In this case, even without any thickness variation, the rotor will wobble between the pads and cause brake pedal pulsation.
    GM recognized this problem several years ago and approved the use of a product called Brake Align, which is a selection of shims that fit between the hub and rotor to correct lateral rotor runout. (See GM service bulletin 0105-23-001). You can avoid this kind of rotor warping by tightening the lug nuts in the proper sequence using a torque wrench – every single time.
    Another common cause of warped rotors is contamination. Imagine the bending forces and stress risers created by corrosion, clumps of brake dust or anything else clamped between the hub and rotor, or between the wheel and rotor.
    Because they are dissimilar metals, aluminum wheels often corrode where they contact the rotor hat. Before assembly, GM recommends cleaning the hub, rotor and wheel with a wire brush, and other manufacturers recommend brushing a thin coat of anti-seize on each surface. But remember, it’s a brake system, so don’t use so much anti-seize that it flings out onto the braking surfaces.

    Surface Variation

    The late Carroll Smith, a racing driver and engineer, wrote of what he learned about disc brakes while working on the original Ford GT40 race car in the 1960s when automotive disc brakes were still new. Smith noted that although a brake rotor can warp in many different ways, he never saw a properly assembled rotor warp in a way that causes brake pedal pulsation. He said that, whether on a race car or a street-driven grocery getter, the rotor irregularity that most commonly causes pedal pulsation results from uneven transfer of friction material from the pad to the rotor. To understand this, we need to understand two basic concepts about brakes.
    First of all, brakes are designed to work within a specific temperature range and the pad friction material is designed with that range in mind. The friction material used for racing doesn’t work at all when the brakes are cold, and the materials that work best for noise reduction can be severely overheated when used on a race car.
    Secondly, during normal use, friction material abrades from the brake pad and adheres to the rotor, forming an extremely thin layer of friction material on the rotor. When the pads and rotor are new, the bedding-in process establishes the initial layer. With continued use, the friction material is abraded away from the rotor and replaced with new material from the pad.
    If the brakes are not properly bedded-in or if the pads are severely overheated at any time, the transfer of friction material from pad to rotor becomes uneven. Heavier deposits can be seen as stains or dark spots on the rotor that won’t wash off. Even if you can’t measure a thickness variation at these spots, they will have a different coefficient of friction when hot. Since that layer of material is only microns thick, it can be cut away by a brake lathe. If uneven deposits happen again, it’s time to select a brake pad that can handle higher temperatures.

    A Fresh Surface

    If the brake pads are worn but everything else looks OK, it’s tempting to just install new pads. It’s also a good bet that the brakes won’t grip that old rotor like the old pads did, especially if they’re a different friction material. The main reason for replacing or resurfacing otherwise flat rotors is to give the new pads a fresh surface for that thin layer of friction material.
    By now the main advantage of on-car brake lathes is well understood: the new friction surface they create is completely parallel to the plane of rotation. This goes a long way towards eliminating comebacks, but with close attention to the details noted earlier, older tools and techniques work just as well. Before removing the rotor, it should be checked for run-out with a dial indicator. If there is run-out, it’s a good idea to check the hub too.

    Other Problems

    Hubs warp, wheel bearings wear, CV-joints become stiff and cause the stub axle to wobble ever so slightly. Each of these things alone could produce such a slight run-out that it can’t be measured, but stacked together it can be felt in the brake pedal. By changing the position of the rotor on the hub, total run-out can be reduced or eliminated. Check it with a dial indicator.
    Worn caliper sliders can also cause pedal pulsation and they can cause rotor wear that doesn’t necessarily show up in the pedal. Uneven pad wear can show up with a fixed caliper that has a jammed piston on one side. As the brake pads wear, the piston that moves freely will constantly bend the rotor slightly toward the stuck piston. With enough heat cycles, the rotor can actually assume that new shape and the brake pads will wear unevenly. There may not be any measurable warp, but unless the rotor is resurfaced during a bra
    ke job the new pads won’t bed in properly.
    Is pedal pulsation dangerous? When mild, it’s merely annoying. But even mild pulsation can influence ABS performance and increase braking distance in a panic stop. In extreme cases or when traction is marginal, uneven braking caused by pedal pulsation can make the car difficult to control. Fortunately, you can control most of the causes of brake pedal pulsation, through understanding how brakes really work and by paying attention to the details.

  • Motor Trend BMW i3 Test – 0 To 60 MPH 6.4 Seconds, Braking Is Unmatched

    BMW i3 BEV owner Peder Norby (InsideEVs contributor) tipped us off to a Motor Trend test article of the battery-electric version of the BMW i3.

    Of particular interest are a few of the test figures:

    • 0 to 60 MPH in 6.4 seconds
    • Braking 60 to 0 MPH 108 feet

    The 6.4-second time is one-tenth of a second quicker than what Car & Driverposted, but a full six-tenths quicker than BMW’s officially posted time of 7.0 seconds.

    Even more impressive is the 60 to 0 MPH braking figure of 108 feet.  As Norby states, The closest to the BMW i3 was the Alpha Romeo 4c at 111 feet.  Most of the others were in the 120-130 range.” 

    Indeed, the BMW i3 is unmatched in this category.  Why the impressive braking performance?  Some think the skinny tires would hold in the i3 back here, but the truth of the matter is that the low curb weight of the i3 (combined with a solid braking system) allows it to excel in this category, despite those tires.  Wider tires could improve this figure slightly (a few feet), but they would add weight, which would negate some of the gain.

    Where those tires show any weakness is in the 0.80 g lateral acceleration (mediocre, think Honda Accord or Subaru Legacy territory) and MT figure eight 0.69 g (approximately equivalent to the Motor Trend result for the Mini Cooper S).

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